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tv   [untitled]    October 21, 2012 5:00pm-5:30pm PDT

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appreciate that and we need that. thank you. >> thank you, mr. everett. >> i'm the type the progressive who grieves believes that we're only as wealthy as the least among us. so means that in san francisco we can only go as far as the african-american young men and women who have been economically disadvantaged for generations here in the city. we need to provide jobs. with when we talk about green jobs of future and sustainable produce, we need to talk about how to feed the single mothers in those communities. we need comprehensive reforms to bring those disadvantaged communitis with us. we cannot provide those folks with jobs unless we reform our drug policies in san francisco,
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which essentially disadvantage and persecute young men of color who on a day to day basis are being subjected to the criminal justice system in a way that is not done by other members of our society. >> you have got another minute. [ laughter ] >> on a day to day basis what we're doing here in san francisco is we are disenfranchising folks and limiting their ability for future employment. once you have a conviction for a non-violent drug-related crime, your chances of getting a future employment are essentially nil. there was a research study published recently in a san francisco newspaper, that showed the rate of drug convictions dropped, and the violent crime here in san francisco did not rise. essentially what we're saying is that there is no correlation between drug use and violent
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crime. so the whole notion that we have to go after these folks to go into their neighborhoods and essentially make had a police state of their neighborhoods is ridiculous, preposterous and anne ethical and moral failure in the city and we need someone bold enough, proud enough to reverse this trend and ex-power the folks because that way we're more united and a stronger city heading into the future. >> can i say one thing? we heard from a police captain that we know that is not true. that has been proven in the literature and i can't believe we're hearing this when we have limited police resources. thank you. >> mr. davis >> let's be frank there are control interests in agenda at city hall and a cronyisticism
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that includes [hr-ufrpl/]ry condominium for the ultra rich, corporate tax breaks, chain stores and parking garages, a vision for san francisco that doesn't include a lot of everyday people. it's getting to where students and seniors on fixed incomes and young families and teachers and firefighters and everyday folks can no longer afford to live in san francisco. we have a crisis of affordability here. i think the city's economic development polices have a lot to do with why we're starting job/housing imbalance when you are so focused on the power elite, the twitter tax breaks and not focused, which i think we need to start to do. on the economic development interests of our small businesses. which are the life blood of the san francisco economy 80% of our economy is small business
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along our commercial corridors and most jobs are created by small businesses each year. the city needs to reorient its economic polices towards small businesses and start to remove the red tape and stream-lining the permitting process and other ways to facilitate small businesses to thrive and survive in san francisco. so my no. 1 priority is reorienting our economic polices away from the cronyism, the power elect elite and back to the small businesses. >> i was born and raised in the district. that is not why i think you should vote for me as your supervisor. my entire life was been committed to this district starting when i worked for the mayor where women were trained
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i know what good social services look like, but i understand that we can't exclude people because they are rich. we can't exclude people because they are middle-class at the expense of making sure we're taking care of one class of people. i worked really hard and there were a lot of people that helped me become the person who i am. sadly, my brother did not make it through. he is in jail now. my sister died from an overdose, and all of this to fight the good fight to make sure that access to opportunity doesn't stop with me. everybody on this panel, we have got some great people and they have made a lot of need to be taken into consideration. but i think that mine experience of not only being on the redevelopment agency
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commission and working on the fire commission and working in the community day in and day out with the people that many of these folks are mentioning is what is going to create the success we need this district. the kids need an opportunity . that is what stops crime. they don't need a handout. they need to learn how to take care of themselves. that is what happened to me and why i am here because of an opportunity, not a handout. i have not seen many of these candidates until now actively engaged in the community. it baffles me and what i would like to see it proof that they have the ability to do this job. my experience, my track record demonstrates that i have the ability to do this job. i am prepared to do this job. thank you very much. and i'm ready and willing and
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so i ask that you seriously consider me. and i will make sure that i get on us on the right path, but more specifically dealing with making sure that we have access to real job opportunities, not just for the rich, not just for the poor, but for everybody in between as well. thank you. >> miss olague would like to use her time card. >> i just wanted to mention that a lot of these ideas that people have referred to this evening, i'm already working on. we have worked extensively with small businesses. we are attempting to establish neighborhood named districts along the divasdero and lower filmore area. i have spend extensive amounts of time in japantown and the lower haight and upper haight and other neighbors of this district. and today we had actually three hearings. one that we were approached by
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members of the community, some community-based organizations. people wanted us to look at the african-american achievement gaps in high schools, which we also ended up talking about the latino achievement gaps and it was really alarming. very disappointing the statistics that we heard today. as miss johnson mentioned we're asking that the housing authority hearings finally be made public, because we need more transparency this and we're asking for a right to return to public housing. we wrote legislation about that, so we have been spending tons of time in the community. >> miss selby. >> i just wanted to say what i want for this district, i don't have the advantage of actually being in office now, but what i want for this district is a safe and thriving district and i want a strong voice for neighborhoods at city hall. i'm the only mother who is running and when i win, i will be the only mother at the board of supervisors. i am the small business person,
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had my own small business for the last ten years. believe me, i know what this city does and doesn't do for small business and it can definitely do more. finally i believe i'm the only president of a neighborhood and merchant organization up here and i have worked hard to turn around the lower haight from one where people said they wouldn't walk on my side of the street to one that is safe, thriving and inclusive and i want to do this for this entire district. i want a safe and thriving district and a voice at city hall for all. >> we have come to the time where members have been so generous with sharing their time cards, i don't know, does anybody else have a minute's worth of a final appeal to get off their chest? miss johnson? >> yes, i have two years' worth of history of voting on really difficult issues. these are people who were
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members of public, who found they needed help and found there was limited access to people in city hall. and you can look this up online. i'm not just pretending that i'm going to do this or just saying that i'm going to do. a lot of politicians will not endorse me because i have held them accountable. you need to pay attention to what people say they will do and what they do. we had muni drivers who were fired because they didn't support prop g and couldn't have access to their personnel files and we had to help them do that. these are the kind of things that we're up against. the voters need to pay attention to the history of how people vote. it's not that we don't have a record, but i believe in participation by the public. and i have a voting record on that. >> thank you. and i guess there are a couple
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other candidates who decided that they have a closing statement to offer as well. mr. everett? >> as an attorney, i am required to uphold the laws of the state of california, and the united states as well. i'm required to do so in a completely even-handed manner. i do so with no problem and with all the love in my heart. that being said, it would be ridiculous, disingenuous and completely unhelpful not to realize that certain segments within our population here in san francisco need help more than others. it would be absolutely preposterous for me to sit up here and tell you that we're going to approach polices of economic advantagement in an even-handed manner. that would do a disservice to and again, we are a weaker city if we allow certain segments of you are population to essentially rot. we're a stronger, vibrant and
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more resilient city if we address the issues of those least among us, tackle them, and face them head-on. >> thank you. >> that is what i'm about. truth and honesty in our policy approached. >> mr. resignato. >> i think one important thing we need to look at is vision. really, you know? a vision for what san francisco is going to be. and i think that involves looking at a lot of different things. one thing that daniel mentioned and we have mentioned about public safety is that we're not using our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that
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before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the
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grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose interests they will be representing. thank you. >> anybody else? miss olague? >> again, i just wanted to welcome all of you to the office, room 256 of city hall and we are engaging with neighbors all the time. recently i voted in favor of community choice aggregation. i am a sponsor of the affordable housing proposition c. we worked extensively with community counsel for housing organizations to make sure that we had the right balance. i worked on the gross receipts measure that is on the ballot currently. so there are a lot of things that we're working on. we're working with small
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businesses extensively and so i welcome you to come in and share your ideas and let's work together to create a better city. i am christiana olague, supervisor district 5 and i appreciate your support in keeping me in office in november. we can work together with all sides of the political spectrum to create the best city we can create, one that is balanced and fair. >> thank you. miss breed? >> why not, right? >> you are a candidate, yes. [ laughter ] >> i am so proud of the work that i have been able to do in the district. i currently have kids that -- and when i say kids, teenagers, 18, 19, 20. i'm not a mom myself, so i look at the kids in the district as my mine. so in order to get them to attend john adams and school, i'm active not just in running for office, but the work doesn't stop because of the campaign. we should elect a supervisor
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who understands the challenges of the district, who understands how to bring people together. and who has, as andrew said, a vision for the future of what the district should look like? i understand and remember the past. it was not always bright in the district. q+!rknow how to make good th happen and bring people together in our community. and also, i know what a great district 5 could potentially look like. the african-american art and culture complex was once a place falling apart. it's now a place thriving with artists and the community and with you if you come visit us. it's an amazing facility and it's exactly what i want to make district 5, an amazing district 5. london breed for district 5 supervisor. >> thank you very much. thank you to all of you, [ applause ] >> before you leave tonight, let me remind you, if you are not registered to vote, please register right away and
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encourage others as well. if you have moved, you need to register again with your new address. on believe of myself, the [wo-uflt/] league of women voters, and sfgtv and our sponsors thank you and good evening. [ applause ]>> the right to vots
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to vote for candidates or party and it is a significant way to have our voice heard. exactly 100 years ago, women were given the vote in california. the battle for women's suffrage was not an easy one. it took more than 70 years. a woman could run for president in new york. >> organizing this conference, basically it modeled itself on a declaration of independence for women. it marked the beginning of the
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women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be
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devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's
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suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadly idea in san francisco. liquor was the foundation of the economy. and >> anything that touched on the possibility of prohibition was greatly and popular. >> the first campaign was a great effort, but not a success. >> the war was not over. less than one decade later, a graphic protests brought new life to the movement. >> women's suffrage, the republican convention in oakland, this time it was the
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private sector response. 300 marched down the streets of the convention center. women were entitled to be here. >> joining together for another campaign. >> women opened a club in san francisco. it was called the votes for women club. if she could get the shopkeepers to have lunch, she could get them to be heard literature. the lunch room was a tremendous success. >> it was the way that people
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thought about women willing to fight for a successful campaign. what happened was, the social transformation increase the boundary of what was possible, out word. >> there were parades and rallies, door to door candidacies, reaching every voter in the state. >> the eyes of the nation were on california in 1911, when we all voted. it was the sixth and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded.
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>> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking place throughout the state. bancroft library is having an exhibit that highlights the women's suffrage movement, chronicling what happened in
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california, bringing women the right to vote. >> how long does this mean going on? >> the week of the 20th. people do not realize that women were allowed to vote as early as the 1920's. in the library collection we have a manuscript from the end of december, possibly longer. >> in commemoration of 100 years of voting in california. 100 years ago this year, we won the right to vote. around 1911, this is how it would have addressed. and here we are, dressed the same.
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[chanting] >> we have the right to vote. >> whether you are marching for a cause or voting in the next election, make your voice heard. thank you for watching.
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